Enterprise Technology Projects: From Project Management To Project Done

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About Enterprise Technology Projects

We provide solutions in project management, organization development, and education. 

  • Project Management: Adjust the methods to meet the needs of the organization.
    We help project teams run better. ETP provides direction and leadership from project initiation to close utilizing proven project methodologies. We reduce staff workloads, mediate between vendors and businesses, and help keep costs under control. 
  • Organization Development: Provide value through increasing the efficiency of the organization.
    We help organizations run efficiently. Rather than look at one element of a business or organization at a time, we take a systemic view to guide groups from inefficiency to efficiency.
  • Education: Help to properly blend brick and mortar with online learning. 
    We assist higher education institutions structure and teach Project Management programs.

What We Believe

We believe successful projects are a result of effective teams. This is why we hand pick our teams for each collaboration. 

We believe the ability for ETP and our client teams to work effectively has just as much to do with personalities as it does skill sets, so we work diligently to connect our teams on that level.

The Folio: ETP Projects and Clients

Enterprise Technology Projects has exceeded our expectations on multiple projects and training programs and are always helping us improve our own business outcomes. 

Enterprise Technology Projects brings together essential aspects of organizational development, change management and professionalism to deliver a high-quality learning experience for our students and staff. We look forward to continuing our business relationship with them on future projects and would highly recommend them to other organizations.
— - Tracy Mastel, Normandale, Health IT Program Director

Other Clients We've Partnered With

TAKE THE NEXT STEP TO SUCCESS, CALL (866) 583-0006 TO DISCUSS COLLABORATING WITH US.

Collaboration of Organization Development and Project Management

Projects across all industries are failing at an alarming rate. Only 64% of projects are actually successful, according to the 2015 Project Management Institute Pulse study. Due to these failures, there is an increasing need for more effective communications and greater efficiencies to increase project success rates for all industries. 

The problem isn't finding organizations needing help with project management. The challenging part is finding practices proven to positively impact the project management process.

Organization Development (OD) and Project Management

Each of these fields, Organization Development (OD) and Project Management, employs processes and practices that, if shared, might increase success in both fields. To be clear, sharing these processes does not mean creating a new department or field, but rather utilizing the key disciplines and practices of one field to help the other become more efficient and effective.  

Communication is a key part of project management; therefore, utilizing the communication skill sets found within OD to increase the effectiveness of a project manager and the success rates of the projects managed is one way for these two fields to collaborate.

In addition, the field of OD can provide an increased focus on methods to help an organization run more effectively and efficiently while, on the other hand, project management can provide an increased focus on successfully managing project scope, budget, schedule, and quality.  

The collaboration of these two disciplines is a relatively new area of focus. There are still questions such as: How can we best structure OD and Project Management fields so they work together to further strengthen the skills used by each discipline? What methods have worked and what methods have not?  Answering these questions might identify a process for future collaboration, and the answers could help increase an organization’s ability to effectively execute projects and change across its enterprise, thereby benefiting those executing said projects.

Read more about Project Management and Organization Development working together to achieve success here.

ETP Adds New Research Department

Enterprise Technology Projects is excited to announce a new service available to our clients, Research. We plan to focus our research on Project Management, Organization Development, and Education.

Meet Our Client: Normandale Community College

At Enterprise Technology Projects, we assist higher education institutions structure and teach Project Management programs.

About Our Work With Normandale Community College

PROBLEM: Education program evaluation and assess for areas to improve to increase enrollment.

SOLUTION: Helped to adjust program content and delivery.  

OUTCOME: Still in process but seem to have increases in student engagement and improved program rigor. 

"Enterprise Technology Projects has exceeded our expectations on multiple projects and training programs and are always helping us improve our own business outcomes. 

Enterprise Technology Projects brings together essential aspects of organizational development, change management and professionalism to deliver a high-quality learning experience for our students and staff. We look forward to continuing our business relationship with them on future projects and would highly recommend them to other organizations."

- Tracy Mastel, Health IT Program Director

Project Management and Business Quotes To Live By

Rallying your team, inspiring them to band together and work towards a common goal are vital to the success of any project. As a Project Manager it is your job to set the tone and culture of your team.

Here is a round-up of inspiring quotes any project manager (or really anyone) can unite behind!

Why You Should Frame Your Organization Chart As A Servant-Leader

Organizations vary greatly on what they use to chart their team. More fluid organizations don't want to have it written or documented at all, since they tend to be smaller models where individuals have their hands in multiple job responsibilities and tasks.

Other, typically larger organizations, such as matrix based companies love their large organizational charts. These charts are typically the pyramid style, with the CEO at the top and contributors at the bottom descending in responsiblity level.

Finding the right organization chart for your company depends on a variety of factors, however you NEED to have some type of structure. At ETP we use an upside down pyramid. In our model, the CEO is at the bottom and then team members extend up form there, level by level.

In this upside-down pyramid, the focus is to show support. The CEO and especially the C-Suite are there from a servent-leadership style. We prefer servant-leadership in the scope of our business at ETP, but also for our clients in their project management needs.

To explain servant-leadership a bit more, it's about being a servant or at service to your team. You are there to assist and provide direction when needed for your team to do their jobs well.

C-Suite, CEO, CFO, etc. are at the bottom of the pyramid supporting the organization at the top. Those doing the day-to-day work are listed at the highest section of the pyramid, so you are illustrating the servant-leadership model. 

The reason the organization chart is so important and should be framed proudly on your office wall is becasue you want to show your team that you as a leader are there to help support them and provide a framework for the work being done. This is especially true in a servant-leadership based organization.

Tips To Becoming A Better Project Manager

It's safe to say, even the most successful Project Managers can learn something new and adopt a new practice to manage their teams. With technology constantly changing the landscape, Project Managers needs to be adaptable, flexible and open to learning new methodologies, techniques and tools. Here are a few articles to help you become a better project manager...

6 Common Mistakes In Project Management

Mistakes happen all the time in Project Management, however don't fall trap to one of these common mistakes that could be avoided... Read More >>


3 Reasons You Need A PM Methodology

There are MANY reasons why adopting a project management methodology for your project is vital, however here are our top three reasons... Read More >>


Project Leaders: More Than Just Project Managers

Project Management is just as much about leadership as it is about management and in some cases it is more about leadership. Read More >>


4 Common Miscommunication Mistakes In Project Management

It's no secret and any project manager professional can tell you, that the most successful projects they've been a part of had top-notch communication tactics and methods. Read More >>

Truly, the best Project Managers are a student of the industry, always striving to learn something new and apply new practices to their next projects.

6 Common Mistakes In Project Management

Mistakes happen all the time in Project Management, however don't fall trap to one of these common mistakes that could be avoided:

1) Communication

Under communication with team members and not being effective in your communication is one of the biggest mistakes PMs can make.

Projects suffer from ineffective communication, whether that be not communicating clearly, or being in a hurry and missing key details.

In projects that are failing, there tends to be a rush in communication and not enough time spent planning out communication, which is putting the project even more at risk.

2) Too Much Structure

We as project managers love planning and project management tools and techniques, so it's easy to place too much structure for our teams in an effort to plan.

It can make it difficult for your team to be efficient and effective when they are trying to work within a rigid structure.

Knowing how much structure, especially around the planning element, to put into a project is important. 

3) Not Being In Person / On-Site

Obviously virtual teams can't be on-site, since there isn't one. Communication takes place online, through computers, phones, emails, etc. However, in other projects where you are at least in the same city if not in the same building, project managers need to be visible, Attending meetings, observing team members, getting face-to-face and in person dialogue is critical for effectively managing a project and more importantly your team. A lot of project managers tend to get caught behind the screen and that's where they stay, relying on computers and telephones to manage their teams.

It's extremely important, if possible, to connect offline with your team. This allows project managers to gather information about their team members, where the project is at and truly best manage resources. There are too many things missed if not at meetings in person.

4) Being In-Personable

Not being approachable is a huge mistake in project management. You need to be able to have an open door, where your team members feel comfortable to approach you with any issues or questions that might arise during a project lifecycle. 

Project managers also need to have an open mind. Certain techniques might not work from one project to the next so it is important to be flexible and open to change.

5) Too Much Focus On Tools

Similar to point #2, it can be easy to bury yourself behind a project plan. The project plan is a tool, not a replacement for discussoins, conversations and dialouge about the project.

The proejct plan is there to help and assist, not to act as the project manager. Project Managers need to gleam real-time information from their team to make the best decision for the project. 

6) Being Realistic

This point falls more on the organization. A lot of organizations have unrealistic goals and expectations of a project, especially around scope, schedule and budget. 

It is important for the organization to understand that only so much can be done given resources, budget and scope of a proejct. We can't create an extra hour each day, turning 24 hours into 25. We also can't effectively execute a project with only 4 resources when really it really needs 8.

Project Managers are faced with unrealistic expectations from leadership all the time, even when requesting more scope, resources or budget. It is important to keep in mind that your job as a PM is to keep an open line of communication with leadership about these expectations versus the reality of the project.

What other common mistakes have you come across as a project manager?

4 Must-Reads About Project Management

Project Management is an essential function in the execution of any project, no matter the scale or complexity. Having a basic understanding of the core concepts in Project Management is critical to effectively leading a team and/or serving on a project-based team.

Here are 4 must-read articles about Project Management:

4 Common Miscommunication Mistakes In Project Management
 

It's no secret and any project manager professional can tell you, that the most successful projects they've been a part of had top-notch communication tactics and methods.

Communications skills and strategy are crucial to drive any project team forward and ensure deliverables are being met.



How To Successfully Manage Your Virtual Team


When it comes to managing your virtual team, one of the key things to keep in mind is that there isn’t just one key for every door. Managing a virtual team across various organizations is going to look different based on resources, team dynamics and the type of project.

 


3 Reasons You Need A Project Manager


It is often called into question, the importance of having a project manager. There tends to be a common misconception that just anyone can be a project manager if one is necessary, however that isn’t quite true.



Project Management and Organization Development: Working Together To Achieve Success


Uncovering the key advantages found when bringing two normally separate departments, Organization Development (OD) and Project Management, together has many advantages. For example, reduce risk and increased efficiencies. Both of these departments exhibit processes and practices that when combined increase the success found in both fields. 

 


Whether you are new to Project Management or just looking to expand your knowledge and practices, Enterprise Technology Projects is a valuable resource.

3 Reasons You Need A PM Methodology

There are MANY reasons why adopting a project management methodology for your project is vital, however here are our top three reasons:

1 - Team

Without some sort of framework to a project, whether it be waterfall, agile or however you determine your project should be managed, you need to have some way of showing a structure.


If you don't, it's chaos. No one team member has a firm understanding of their role within the project. In actuality, you don't really have a team unless there are working agreements in place. The working agreement is there to determine how everyone is going to work together to complete the project and meet deliverables.

Without guide rails or parameters to understand how everyone is working together, there truly is disorder and you really don't have a team without those connecting components. We all know that projects without a functioning team have a limited chance of success. 

2 - Making It Easy

Equally important is to make things as easy as possible for your team a.k.a. subject matter experts. Providing a framework enables organization and makes it easier for them to operate within the parameters of the project methodology.

If Waterfall is the methodology they are accustomed to, then setting up a waterfall based project would allow them to function more efficiently as a team. The same applies if Agile is the framework that would provide an easier project path.

Having a working agreement and an understanding of what tools and processes should be put in place to make the working environment easier is very important.

3 - Reporting To Leadership


Reporting to leadership without a structure in place or project management foundation is an inefficient way to report to leadership.

For example, it makes if difficult to answer questions like:  Where is the project at? Where do we expect to be? What are our goals throughout the project? There needs to be some way to report this information.

In order for leadership to make executive decisions, they need to know the triple constraint (scope, schedule, budget) of a given project, which is best provided with a solid project management structure in place.

While it may seem adopting a project management methodology can be a casual decision, it does need to be well thought out and executed to be 100% effective and positively impact project goals.

Project Leaders: More Than Just Project Managers

Project Management is just as much about leadership as it is about management and in some cases it is more about leadership.

Regardless of whether you use an Agile or Waterfall based project structure, your management style doesn't change, simply the foundation of the project changes. How you lead the team through an Agile or Waterfall based project should stay consistent.

Leadership Focus

Having a leadership focus is fundamental in any successful project. Being able to create an environment focused on open communication, working together with an end goal in mind and having a clear understanding of what that end goal is.

What are we trying to accomplish? What is the primary objective? These are key quesitons to keep in front of the team.

Leadership is almost more important (at least to ETP) than whether you use waterfall or agile. Waterfall and agile, doesn't impact that leadership focus, regardless of methodology.

Leadership and Management

We tend to be so focused on the triple constraint of a project: scope, schedule, and budget that we turn ourselves off as project managers to leadership. This can be the biggest mistake in any project.

Project Leaders need to provide the inspiraiton and the passion to keep the project moving forward. To help your team overcome obstacles and remove road blocks. Road blocks are a key component for project leaders to address, regardless of waterfall or agile methods. You have to be someone that people can come to when they need something fixed or resolved, and if something is holding them up.

In some respects, the name should be project leader versus project manager as the success of any project truly comes down to leadership.

Agile Vs. Waterfall Project Management

One of the biggest questions in the Project Management industry tends to be what is the difference between Agile Project Management and Waterfall Project Management, and what is the best system for my project.

In a true Waterfall project, you are doing your project planning at the beginning of the project and in an Agile project you are planning in 2-week sprints, almost like little mini waterfall projects.

Agile is extremely popular in the world of IT, but has been implemented in other industries, including automotive and construction. The Healthcare industry or those projects focused heavily on safety, tend to adopt Waterfall.

There are several components of Agile Project Management that could be applied to a Waterfall based project. For example, daily standups, where the team gets together for 10-15 minutes, preferably at the beginning of the day to talk about what they've been doing, what needs to get accompliash and any road blocks they've encountered.

These discussions can happen in either waterfall or agile. In fact, they SHOULD happen in either one.

Waterfall tends to get a bad wrap for a couple reasons. First, you have to do all of the planning upfront, which can seem like a daunting task. There is also a misconception that you can't change the plan once it has been written, however the plan is more of a guide or pathway throughout the life of your project and can be adapted (within reason) as needed.

Agile allows more of an open source of changes. You could actually make a complete pivot if needed in-between your 2-week sprints. That's not always recommended, but it is possible with the flexibility Agile provides.

Enterprise Technology Projects uses both waterfall and agile project management methods. We belive it comes down to the culture of the organization we are working with and the team itself. We strive to find the best suited project management style for the project.

Often times if we are dealing with a project that is going to require extensive planning up-front, then we will use Waterfall Project Management. If the project is IT-based or could be rapidly changing, we lean towards Agile Project Management.

What project management style do you tend to prefer?

What is Waterfall Project Management

Plan Then Execute In Project Management

In Waterfall Project Management, you are doing the bulk of the planning upfront. The Project Management Institute states there are 5 steps for any Waterfall based project: 

  1. Initiate
  2. Plan
  3. Execute
  4. Monitor and Control
  5. Close

Notice here that the planning is at the front. You do as much planning as you possibly can before you start executing the work. Plan the work and then work the plan.

In Waterfall Project Management, try to have as much of the information detailed out at the beginning, rather than trying to introduce it throughout the project, like you might in agile project management.

Pros and Cons of Waterfall Project Management

Leadership tends to like Waterfall because you are able to give fairly accurate dates from the start. For example, we are expecting to close the project on this date or we are expecting to complete this chunk of work on this date, etc. There is this larger plan that they can look at and track to.

The downside is there tends to be this belief that you can't change the plan once it has been created. This isn't necessarily true. Often, the first casualty in project management is the plan.
So you build this plan in a waterfall project, then we start executing the project and then the first thing you might notice is that something wasn't planned quite right or that something needs to get added to it.

Technology tools like Microsoft Project for instance, allow us to change project plans and see what the overall impact to the project is in terms of time. For example, if you need to add three days to task #7, will it push the plan out or not.

In Waterfall Project Management, you develop the plan and then you build it, with deliverables and due dates set out in advance. 

What is Agile Project Management?

Agile Project Management Happens In Sprints

Agile Project Management is referred to as Scrum, which is what ETP uses most often when working on agile projects.

During Agile Project Management, planning occurs throughout the project and you plan in what are called sprints. Most often in IT-based projects you will see 2-week sprints. In other industries like construction you might have 1-month sprints. Whatever makes the most sense for the type of business and the type of project.

Since you are planning throughout the project, you plan ahead of the sprint, do the work and then evaluate and plan for the next sprint. In between sprints, you determine what went well, what didn't as well as what got accomplished and what didn't. You learn from the outcomes and then put those lessons learned into play for the next sprint and phase of work.

Advantages To Agile Project Management

A key advantage is working in intervals of time through the duration of the project, allowing you to see accomplishments early on which helps motivation the team and constituents. 

The biggest advantage is you are able to make changes along the way. This allows you to better align the priorities in subsequent project sprints as well as adjust the back log as necessary by adding, removing or modifying tasks. 

Keep in mind, task changes are done in between your sprints, not in the middle.

Agile Project Management allows you to continually gauge your process, task list and success in intervals, resulting in enhanced productivity and process flexibility.

4 Common Miscommunication Mistakes In Project Management

It's no secret and any project manager professional can tell you, that the most successful projects they've been a part of had top-notch communication tactics and methods.

Communications skills and strategy are crucial to drive any project team forward and ensure deliverables are being met.

Here are 4 of the most common miscommunications mistakes that happen in project management:

#1 :: Thinking You've Actually Communicated, And You Haven't.

Often times in a project team, you as the PM may say something 3 or 4 times and STILL miss a section of your team, or worse yet they misinterpreted what you said. Never assume that you have communicated thoroughly until you have gotten a response or acknowledgement back form each member of the team you are communicating to.

#2 :: Thinking You've Communicate Enough.

Next, no amount of communication is ever enough. It's actually difficult to over communicate, however it is very easy to under-communicate or not communicate enough and miss team members or groups. This is especially true if you are in a high matrix organization and you have lots of oversight.

In order to effectively communicate, you need to do so 7 times, 7 ways. This is a good method for gauging the importance of communication. Keep in mind, this all depends on the details of what you are trying to communicate. For example, if you have a small detail, like a change in meeting attendance, that wouldn't really warrant 7 different forms of communication.

Be sure to match the method to the need, and then it is actually nearly impossible to over-communicate.

#3 :: Thinking There Is Only One Communication Method.

Believing communication methods are a one-size fits all model. Some project managers are heavily reliant on email and think that is the only way we can communicate. Obviously, the best form of communication has been, is and will likely always be face-to-face communication. Don't rely on an email to be your only and truest method of communicating a project detail, because it simply isn't.

#4 :: Thinking Communication Can't Be Planned In Advance.

Not planning for communication is a major miscommunication. Projects offer many opportunities to plan in advance for the various communications that may arise during a project. You don't necessarily have to wait until the communication needs to go out, but can be proactive and plan for when communication should be sent.

Making sure we plan for each communication the best as possible, increases the likelihood project constituents will understand the intended message. Obviously, as a project is executed some updates and changes will need to happen rapidly right and on-the-go, however others can be planned.

If you find yourself falling into one of these 4 common miscommunications mistakes, it's never too late to correct it! Take steps now to correct and improve on your communication processes and methodologies.

How To Successfully Manage Your Virtual Team

When it comes to managing your virtual team, one of the key things to keep in mind is that there isn’t just one key for every door. Managing a virtual team across various organizations is going to look different based on resources, team dynamics and the type of project.

 

However, there are three basic concepts to implement in managing a team virtually that will help deliver successful results: technology, organization and making it easy.

Technology

This is likely the biggest concept to adapt as you manage a virtual team. Finding a format to meet, preferrably video or at the very least audio, that can work across multiple devices is critical. Most organizations struggle with the fact that they have a platform internally they use, however that might not be accessible or work with an outside organization. Determining the platform(s) communication will occur in is a crucial first step to the success of a project.

There is a reluctance to use video conferencing, since it is still a bit new, however it is the closest thing to face-to-face communication you can get. Video allows you to see first-hand the reactions of your fellow project management team, in order to gauge their response to a comment or key idea.

Organization

This point might seem obvious enough, however in the age of cloud sharing and mobile access, it is often not considered with enough intentionality.

You must have ONE central location for all files, whether that be DropBox, Google Drive, etc. Whatever fileshare platform you use, it MUST be open to everyone across any network. And taking this point a step further, be sure there are no permission issues and that everyone can access files when they need them, especially if they are mobile.

Last component of organization is to be sure files and documents are easy to find. Keep things stored orderly and in a logical structure, so project constituents can find what they are looking for quickly and easily.

Making It Easy

This point reinforces the fact that the more barriers to entry, the less likely people are going to participate. Don’t create an environment where it is more work to integrate the team then actually need the team. If it’s too much work, then team members will drop-off and stop engaging, then causing the project to suffer.

Keeping these three concepts in mind when developing and managing your virtual team will significantly help in the outcome of any given project.

Now, there are limitations that can arise with particular organizations, such as healthcare or government agencies, where high security standards can make it more difficult for outside vendors or contractors to participate virtually.

However, you want to make the process as simple as possible. Also, as mobile-friendly as possible. Keep in mind, your virtual team, communication tools and project strategy will look different across organizations and across projects. As long as you keep on the forefront the importance of technology, organization and making it easy, you are on the right track to project success!

3 Reasons You Need A Project Manager

It is often called into question, the importance of having a project manager. There tends to be a common misconception that just anyone can be a project manager if one is necessary, however that isn’t quite true.

Here are several critical reasons why project managers are essential for the effective and successful completion of any project, regardless of scope.

  1. Be A Central Point Of Contact

  2. Keep Subject Matter Experts Focused

  3. Provide Not Just Management But Leadership

Central Point Of Contact.

This is essential from an organization standpoint and serves as the largest reason project managers are put into place. Organization leaders have a central point of contact regarding the health of a project. PMs provide information on the project schedule, budget and scope, referred to as the triple constraint. Having one person tracking progress, allows leaders to quickly access necessary information, without distracting those actively working on the project.

Subject Matter Experts Remain Focused On The Project.

Subject Matter Experts are the ones actively working on the project and doing the heavy lifting of getting it completed. The goal is to keep SME’s as focused as possible. Without a PM, you are pulling key SME’s off task to handle the scheduling, resource allocation, etc. Project Managers take on these components in order to keep SME’s focused on their area of expertise and likely what they are most passionate about.

Be Not Just A Project Manager, But A Project Leader.

Organizations often refer to PM’s as managers, but one thing missing from that notion is the concept of leadership. The key difference between a Manager and a Leader is the ability to inspire others. Leaders help create passion in the work and this is a critical element of what an effective PM brings to every project. Leadership helps keep the team focused, on task and excited about the project at hand.

In conclusion, no matter the scope. No matter the subject matter. Project Managers are vital to the outcome of a project. You need someone to drive the ship, rally the crew, and bring the ship home!

Enterprise Technology Projects: Changing The Scope Of Doing Business

ETP helps create effective and efficient teams in your company through project management,
organization development and education

CEO of Enterprise Technology Projects, Eric T. Pool MSM, PMP, CSM, announced the formation of his project management company geared towards defining a clear picture of success for project teams, educational programs and startup organizations.

Pool says he is building an educated and well-rounded team to collaborate with transportation, healthcare, education, human resources and supply chain companies around the globe. Team members of ETP can adjust their practices based on the needs of the organization and their culture. Specifically, ETP can provide training on Agile or Waterfall project management techniques to organize programs and projects as well as teams across the company.

Pools says, “We assisted Hyperloop Transportation Technologies, a company transforming the transportation industry founded as a result of a white paper by Elon Musk, in working towards the creation of a Project Management Office (PMO) and educating the organization on how to use project management.”

Pool has completed his Master of Business Management degree and is currently working towards comple ting a doctoral degree in Organization Development with a focus on Project Management at the University of Saint Thomas, Minnesota.

He is joined by five other team members from diverse industry sectors who bring a variety of experiences to the company.

Sarah R. Pool, MS, RN, Quality Systems Analyst, has completed her Master of Science degree with a focus in Nursing Education. She has the knowledge to identify, measure and prioritize quality improvement tools and methods.

Angela Maris, Director of Sales, is a sales professional with over 15 years of sales experience. Angela has worked closely with some of the largest healthcare organizations in the country.

Jim Zucchini, Educational Program Development Consultant, serves as the Senior Implementation Associate for World Savvy, a 501 (c) (3) which educates and engages youth to learn, work and thrive as a responsible global citizens in the 21st century. 

Paul Kuhrmeyer, Senior Organization Development Consultant, is the owner and president of Connelly Industrial Electronics, a systems integrator and industrial controls company based in the Twin Cities.

Lacey Hart, Project Management Excellence Advisor, has over 20 years of experience in health care delivery, 10 years of IT innovation and product development and five years enabling start- up ventures.

About Enterprise Technology Projects

Enterprise Technology Projects provides solutions in project management, organization development and education while utilizing Agile or Waterfall methodologies. Their educated and diverse staff members provide a well-rounded perspective and knowledge-base to businesses around the globe. With their systematic practices, ETP helps companies run more efficiently thus keeping costs under control. ETP is proud to call the diverse community of Rochester, Minnesota home.

Project Management and Organization Development: Working Together To Achieve Success

Uncovering the key advantages found when bringing two normally separate departments, Organization Development (OD) and Project Management, together has many advantages. For example, reduce risk and increased efficiencies. Both of these departments exhibit processes and practices that when combined increase the success found in both fields. 

To be clear, bringing together does not mean creating a new department, but rather utilizing the key disciplines and practices of one department to help the other become more efficient and effective. For example, communication is a key part of project management, therefore utilizing the communication skill sets found within OD to increase the effectiveness of a project manager and the success rates of the projects managed is one way for these two fields to integrate.

Project Managers also need to work on project plans and become more effective at planning. They must manage not just the project itself in terms of scope, but also the resources necessary to execute the project. Therefore, they must also be effective resource managers as well as project managers.

Organization Development practitioners are often times consultants working either internally or externally to an organization so their business models are based on services and results for the organization, from a systemic point of view.  This view is not limited to a unit within an organization. It is not necessarily a department within an organization. 

Having these common components in the definition is key for bringing these two fields together. It is important to try and find similarities in areas where the two can connect.

It is important to remain cognizant of how effective Project Managers and Organizational Development Consultants are at their work. Effectiveness leads to the ability to gain bigger and better projects. If projects are delivered successfully, one can hope to receive another and another and move forward.

Effectiveness in this case is two-sided, however one can't lose site of the other. Project Managers tend to focus largely on the effectiveness of how a project is executed, while in the field of OD the focus is primarily on how the project will impact the entire organization. Thus, if a project is executed efficiently it is more likely to have a positive impact on the organization as a whole.